Tag Archives: fake

CVS Homeopathy Less Painful Than Bloodletting

CVS Pushes The Snake Oil

[UPDATE]

On the Atheists On Air Facebook page the comments have provoked a shit-storm.  Surprisingly there are Atheists aka freethinkers who haven’t applied skepticism, logic, reason nor science to some of their beliefs.

There is a misunderstanding between homeopathic medicines and natural medicines.  There is also, the “who does it hurt” bullshit.

If you are one of these who have a defense for homeopathic medicines, please first review:

1.  http://whatstheharm.net/homeopathy.html
2.  http://theness.com/neurologicablog/index.php/debating-homeopathy-part-ii/

…before even reading this article – as it will only serve to piss you the fuck off causing you to launch an ignorant defense of the demonstrably indefensible.

[END UPDATE]

My previous post today is evident of my angst with CVS.  I’m sure the others, Walmart, Walgreens and Rite-Aid are doing the same but I know first hand that CVS is peddling the woo as if it was real medicine with real value and real results.  CVS Homeopathy is less painful than bloodletting but equally effective.

The allergy, cold and sinus section:
CVS Snake Oil Homeopathy

most expensive water40 Doses of Water for only $12.79

A whopping 6.75 ounces of water.  And best of all… “it works naturally with your body” – as water often does.  No matter your cough dry or wet, this concoction includes remedies for all those pesky symptoms your child may experience.  And if it doesn’t work, you can always try bloodletting.

Or you could pray over an 8oz. glass of water for about .01 percent of the cost.  It’s magic – who ya gonna trust, Jesus or CVS?

Oh look!  It’s the Multi-Symptom Formula… It contains just enough of nothing to fake treat all those pesky symptoms.

With the addition of real honey, they have created the ultimate cure all – sugar water for only $1.80 an ounce.  It’s a wonder they can stay in business with deals as good as this.

CVS Homeopathic Product Ingredients

 

Sugar water for only $12.79

 

A quick refresher course:  “C” represents hundreds as in 1 part per hundred, but 6C is the same as 12X or 1 part in 1,000,000 (one part in one million).

  • Antimonium tartaricum – (Antimony tartrate) – the double salt of potassium.  You probably have heard of Ipecac – well it’s used to induce vomiting but deluded to this level is equivalent to pouring one gallon of bourbon into a 1 million gallon swimming pool – drinking it and hoping to get drunk. It is so heavily diluted that it’s rendered completely useless.  But just imagine undiluted how effective it would be on your young offspring at loosening mucus.  Nothing quite like uncontrolled and violent vomiting.
  •  Bryonia – (Bryony) – a poisonous plant that is so lethal that the Royal Navy named a couple of war ships after it.  From the root of this dangerous vine is a milky white substance.  If contacted with the skin often causes immediate blisters.  Fortunately for the unsuspecting parents and children, this has been diluted to 3C or 1 part in 100,000 parts.  Safe even if it was arsenic diluted to this level.  Used to cure leprosy centuries ago, this highly toxic plant extract causes mucous type diarrhea.
  • Drosera – (sundews) – a carnivorous plant that’s flowers, stem and about any other part was used in the 12th century to treat coughs.  Diluted just enough so you don’t get any, it’s claimed to relieve “barking” coughs.
  • Ipecacuanha – (Carapichea ipecacuanha) – Again with the Ipecac – vomit inducing plant extract but diluted to 1 part in 100,000.  Just enough so that you don’t get one drop of this shitty stuff.
  • Pulsatilla – (pasque flower) – Highly toxic extract used currently to treat the swelling of testicles which is similar to a wet cough – they did say “multi-symptom” on the box.  To be double safe though, they have increased the dosage to 6c – 1:1,000,000 – remember the pool and gallon of bourbon?  And yes, these Snake Oil peddlers consider the dosage more potent if the substance is diluted even more.  So to them, 6 C is twice as potent as 3C.
  • Rumex crispus – (oxalic acid) – known to help you if you are short on kidney stones, this plant extract is very toxic and can even damage your urinary tract.  Luckily for all of us, it’s super potent at 6C dilution.  1:1,000,000
  • Spongia Tosta – (hermaphroditic sponge) Yes!  It’s the boiled down juices from a hermaphroditic sea sponge.  Sign me the fuck up!  These cool sea sponges really do – when told to go fuck themselves.  1 part per 100,000 just to insure you don’t receive even a tiny bit of this sea sponge juice.
  • Sticta pulmonaria – (Lichen) (Lungwort) – another extract with absolutely no medicinal value.  It’s diluted to 3C or 1:100,000

WARNING! Do not use 1/2 of a lizard tail

That sums up the “active” ingredients.  To make your own homeopathic remedy, take 1 part of the plant extract or elixir and add 99 parts milk sugar or starch.  Stir for one hour.  This would equal 1C.  Now to make 2C dilution, take one part of that mixture you just made and add 99 parts starch again. Repeat once more for 3C.

You can also find a dried lizard tail and wear it over your left ear between your ear and your head for 9 days.  By the end of the 9th day, remove the dried lizard tail and you should be feeling much better.  Do not overdose and use half of a lizard tail, this can be far too potent.

Homeopathy is less painful than bloodletting

Next time you’re at your local CVS pharmacy and snake oil store – check out the homeopathic remedies.  Notice how well they are marketed along with real treatments, note how the packaging looks similar to real medicines and grab a box and read the contents.

FYI: 12C or 24X is the same dilution as dropping one pinch of sugar into the north and south Atlantic Oceans.  It would be impossible to find even one molecule of that original sugar.

Post up your findings at our Facebook page.

Infant Cough Syrup Snake Oil Woo Woo

 

 

 

Baby Still In Pain After CVS Pharmacy Placebo Taken

My daughter accidentally purchased fake magic medicine #homeopathy liquid for grandson’s teething pain at #CVS Pharmacy. It was on the same shelf and alongside the real medicine.  CVS is one of many Snake Oil Woo Woo peddlers and now boast their own line of CVS branded magic water and magic water coated pills.

The profit margins are huge in this business of duping the unsuspecting medicine seekers.  One ounce of “magic” water – CVS Pharmacy Placebo can run you as much as $39 an ounce and magic water coated pills, even more.

Professor Stephen Overdosed

More than once, Professor Stephen has debunked the homeopathic remedies on the AOA.fm show.  Several months ago he took an entire bottle of homeopathic pills on air.  You can hear his Snake Oil Science Woo Woo segment during each show.  I believe it was on that same show, the author of the website below, How does homeopathy work – joined us.

How Does Homeopathy Work?

Lately my TV has been inundated with CVS’s latest commercial.  [see below] The final word: “Health is everything.”  Yes, right after profit.  How can a company boast it’s care for our wellbeing while peddling such a vast selection of snake oil?

http://atheists.fm/1JzADuK

CVS Peddles Fake Medicine

[chewing on the cardboard box would have been more effective]

CVS started marketing this fake shit last year under their own label. It’s a concoction of water and orange flavoring. There is absolutely no medicinal value.

A struggling new mom spends $7.00 on less than a 1 oz. bottle of flavored water to relieve a baby’s pain. Do they really think an infant will have a placebo effect?

New parents attempt to provide the best for their children and “trust” that their pharmacy will offer only those products that are tested and proven effective but CVS dupes the masses with fake medicines marketed alongside real medicines.

CVS Pushes Homeopathic Chemotherapy Support

Chemotherapy HomeopathyThe CVS website boasts a large section on Homeopathy.  The article entitled Cancer Chemotherapy Support caught my attention while searching for their response to homeopathic cures and treatments.

Further down the same page you will find the “references” section.  Hidden unless you click the tiny + symbol is the one and only reference (no link) for a study.  Googling the content I found the study and it’s results: Read Here.

Amazing, the study is inconclusive and requires further testing.  Testing less than 30 patients and only one test – CVS titles this section “Scientific Evaluations” – with an ‘s’.  WTF?  Only one evaluation skeptics are whackaloonsand it provided expected results – none.  The test wasn’t duplicated or peer reviewed but CVS has no problem referencing it.

For a company attempting to rebrand itself as a leader in healthcare by removing cigarettes from it’s line up and offering clinics in some of it’s stores, they are really sending mixed signals when they continue to market and promote fake medicine alongside real treatments.

Teething

The teething liquid obviously didn’t work and my daughter had to purchase real medicine. The $6.99 isn’t the big issue here – it’s instead a baby that had to suffer several more hours because CVS marketed and sold fake medicine alongside real medicines.

We should demand CVS and other pharmacies to stop selling and profiting on fake medicines that only serve to delay real care.

Have you accidentally purchased fake medicine from a pharmacy?  Share your story below.